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Alternative Hate

The trend of inventing and popularizing words broadcast by the media and politicians is hotter than ever. I’ve already written about the evolution of the word “extremist.” Now we have alternatives.

Why, pray tell, we cannot be straightforward is beyond me. But political correctness compounded with political warfare supersedes common sense, even in describing the worst side of humanity. With the love of the word “extremist” when describing Islamic terrorists, the media should favor the same word when it comes to the opposite poles of the political spectrum, right? Wrong.

The extreme left is the alt-left, and the extreme right is the alt-right. (For an interesting etymology click here.) Lately it’s been impossible to read or watch the news and avoid those terms. But what do they mean? Alternative hate? Alternative politics, which ultimately end in hate? Alternative perspectives so strong they lead to hate? Well, hate is in there somewhere, that is for sure.

Someone on social media made the point that the one thing both “alts” share is their hatred of Jews. And you know what? The same is true of “extremists.”  Sadly, Jews are the eternal scapegoat.

Meanwhile the world may fall apart around us while the hatred turns violent.

But we get snazzy with words.


Related Reading:

Extremely Extreme Extremists

Writing for #Snowflakes

Political Correctness in Fiction


D.M. Miller is the author of the interfaith “Heart” series as well as the poetry collection, Dandelion Fuzz and memoir, Half-Jew: Searching for Identity. The product of an interfaith marriage herself, Miller’s work explores the difficult themes of religion, politics, ethnicity, culture, family, ancestry and love. See her books on Amazon.

Holiday of the Heart

Introducing… The next Heart series book:

Holiday of the Heart

Holiday Cover Smaller

Holiday of the Heart will be out in September 2017. More details coming soon!


D.M. Miller is the author of the interfaith “Heart” series as well as the poetry collection, Dandelion Fuzz and the memoir, Half-Jew: Searching for Identity. The product of an interfaith marriage herself, Miller’s work explores the difficult themes of religion, politics, ethnicity, culture, family, ancestry and love. See her books on Amazon.

Writing for #Snowflakes

Throughout the ages, authors have been daring, writing provocative content to get the masses to think. Despite sparking controversy, this type of literature has indeed had an impact on society. Fiction can, after all, create empathy (as I mention here in this video), and make readers see others in a different light.

It can be argued that some controversial books would have been better left unpublished (Mein Kampf, anyone?), while others have their place. Check out this list of 25 of the most controversial books of all time. The Color Purple, Harry Potter, and The Satanic Verses are among those classics which created waves.

I happen to write about touchy subjects, like interfaith relationships (Jews and Muslims? Eek!), particular religious verses, and the Jewish ethnicity (What ethnicity? It’s a religion only!). Do I offend some people? Of course. But why write if not to make the reader stop and think? I write with a purpose. Part of that purpose is entertainment value, but I don’t write for snowflakes and don’t believe it’s the writer’s job to tiptoe around the issues.

That’s my take on it. Now here is an article by author Maria Gibbs, who has addressed the same topic. Take a look at what she has to say in this excellent piece:

SHOULD WE STIFLE OUR CHARACTERS/BOOKS IN CASE WE OFFEND

“More and more I am seeing people say that they are getting bad reviews because they didn’t warn the reader of something that may potentially offend them. A love story that contains an affair or anything that someone may find controversial.

“What is a book?

“A story that is either a reflection on real life or a trip into a fantasy world which has no connection to reality. We will never be able to write 100% to please every reader and what works for one person will rub raw on another…”

Click here to continue reading. I highly recommend you do!


See also:

Political Correctness in Fiction (my video rant on the same topic)


D.M. Miller is the author of the interfaith “Heart” series as well as the poetry collection, Dandelion Fuzz and the memoir, Half-Jew: Searching for Identity. The product of an interfaith marriage herself, Miller’s work explores the difficult themes of religion, politics, ethnicity, culture, family, ancestry and love. See her books on Amazon.

A Review to Remember

Reviews are hard to come by. That may be the understatement of the year. (See my video on the topic here.) With that said, every once in a while, a reader comes along and blows me away with invaluable feedback. My latest book, Half-Jew: Searching for Identity, has struck a nerve with my fellow Half-Jews, which was, I must admit, one of the main objectives. It can be confusing growing up in an interfaith family, especially when one parent is Jewish, and there is an inherent spiritual connection to Israel and the Jewish people. I want Half-Jews to know they are not alone, and this particular reader connected with the book and posted a five-star review which really touched me.

Take a look:

“A Book that Every Jew Should Read”

It’s difficult to put into words how much I appreciate this book. I am also a half-Jew, having a Jewish father and a non-Jewish mother. In describing her life growing up, Ms. Miller brought back many memories of my own that I experienced while growing up. I was especially reminded of some episodes with anti-Semitism, which included anti-Semitism from my mother’s side of the family. I remember being asked numerous times during Christmas seasons, by my relatives on my mother’s side, why we Jews killed Jesus. This wasn’t so much a question as an accusation — how depraved can you be to have killed Jesus? One Christmas I answered with Lenny Bruce’s joke — because Jesus wouldn’t become a doctor. After that, I stopped being asked why I was a Christ-killer. Thus, I discovered why there are so many Jewish comedians. It’s a great way to deal with anti-Semitism. I’m not sure many Jews realize that we half-Jews face all of the anti-Semitism any Jew faces, and often more — as it’s not uncommon for one’s non-Jewish relatives to be anti-Semites.

As Ms. Miller points out, there is no justifiable reason why we half-Jews are not accepted as Jews. Nothing in Judaism, Jewish history, or modern-day genetics supports excluding us from the tribe. Like Ms. Miller, I always identified as a Jew, even as a child, and shall continue to identify myself as a Jew until the day I die. Unlike some so-called Jews, like Noam Chomsky, as one example, I support Jews and Israel and would never dream of siding with anti-Semites, especially Holocaust-deniers, as Chomsky has done. Yet, Jews consider Chomsky to be a Jew, while they exclude people who support Jews and Israel simply for having the “wrong” Jewish parent. It makes no sense whatsoever for Jews to accept Chomsky as a Jew while excluding us half-Jews who are proud to call ourselves Jews.

I never could have written a book like this. I have too much anger over the injustice of being excluded as a Jew for no sensible reason. Ms. Miller has not written an angry book about this issue at all, but an insightful one instead. Hopefully, this book will open some minds within the Jewish community so that they will be more accepting of their half-Jewish cousins. In a world where the Jewish population is shrinking, it makes no sense to exclude us.

In my opinion, Ms. Miller is a real hero for having written such a charming book regarding this subject that has affected so many of us. I am proud to call her a fellow Jew and am thankful that she has used her voice to point out the injustice that we half-Jews face by being excluded from our own cultural heritage.

I’d like to thank the reader responsible for these kind words. 🙂

See the review on Amazon here.


My videos on the topic:

Half-Jew

Half-Jew: Can You Really Be Half?

Interfaith Relationships: Can They Work?


D.M. Miller is the author of the interfaith “Heart” series as well as the poetry collection, Dandelion Fuzz and the memoir, Half-Jew: Searching for Identity. The product of an interfaith marriage herself, Miller’s work explores the difficult themes of religion, politics, ethnicity, culture, family, ancestry and love. See her books on Amazon.

Who Is Abdul?

Who is the character Abdul from The Religion of the Heart? Watch my new video to find out more!


D.M. Miller is the author of the interfaith “Heart” series as well as the poetry collection, Dandelion Fuzz and the memoir, Half-Jew: Searching for Identity. The product of an interfaith marriage herself, Miller’s work explores the difficult themes of religion, politics, ethnicity, culture, family, ancestry and love. See her books on Amazon.

Extremely Extreme Extremists

Extremist is a funny word. From the adjective “extreme,” it somehow evolved to the noun form, now adopted and overused in the world of political correctness.

It began with Islamic extremists or fundamentalists, taking their religion to the extreme, which was a nice way of saying they focused on the violence. It stemmed from ideas like, “convert or die,” and vengeance for what they saw as injustice from the West for meddling in their affairs, in war, and “colonialism,” another powerful word these days.

But the word these “extremists” now use for Westerners is “Crusaders,” hardly a politically correct term. It’s like calling all Americans today “slave drivers” for the sins of their fathers, while clumping immigrants, first, second, third and fourth generations, right along with them. Naturally, immigrant families who arrived after slavery was abolished have no ties to the abhorrent practice. And for those who do, that was then, this is now. It’s hardly fair to be blamed for what others before us did, and the same goes for Crusaders.

On the Western front, we tiptoe around the issues, softening reality with weakened terms, while “Islamic extremists” take the opposite approach, using harsh words, emotional words, to intensify the hate.

Now we have removed “Islamic” from the term and simply say “extremist” because Muslims who want nothing to do with terrorists don’t want the name of their religion associated with these acts. It’s bad press after all.

So we are left with the naked word “extremist.”

As it happens, extremism is gaining momentum, not only among Islamic terror groups but in the world of causes. Across the board, people are taking their issues to the extreme.

Take feminism, for example. I used to call myself a feminist when I thought it was about equality. But now it is about superiority. And pro-choice has transformed from a tough decision often regretted for life, to today’s, “I wish I could have an abortion,” aborting nearly full-term babies, and convincing women to abort their babies rather than giving them up for adoption so their body parts can be sold.

It has also turned into, “your cause is my cause” with Linda Sarsour and her ilk introducing the Palestinian cause to feminism, which has resulted in a growing anti-Semitism within the ranks and further pushing former liberal Jews to the conservative side.

The same is happening among gay rights activists, as Times of Israel blogger Marika Stein so eloquently points out in her article entitled, “Will I have to be afraid?” about anti-Semitism at the Chicago Dyke March.

Progressivism is no longer open-minded but narrow-minded. Free speech only applies to the Left while dissenting opinion is shut down.

Black Lives Matter went from peaceful protests to calling for the murder of cops to killing cops.

Anti-Trump demonstrators became rioters and looters, and celebrities killing the president in effigy turned into someone shooting and attempting to murder Republicans.

Extremists.

A friend of mine used to say that once a group meets the objective, the job is over. The next move is to search for a new gripe to keep it going, to take it to the extreme. It progresses from, “I am against this,” or, “this is not fair,” to, “I hate you,” to, “I want to kill you,” to actually killing.

What does “extremism” really mean? Taking a cause to the extreme. And what exactly is that extreme? Hatred and violence.

You see, it really doesn’t matter whether the hatred is on the Left or the Right, from terrorists or from anti-Semitic social justice warriors. Hate is extreme, and hate leads to violence. When tensions are high, we tend to fight one extreme with another.

In the end, nothing is solved.


D.M. Miller is the author of the interfaith “Heart” series as well as the poetry collection, Dandelion Fuzz and the memoir, Half-Jew: Searching for Identity. The product of an interfaith marriage herself, Miller’s work explores the difficult themes of religion, politics, ethnicity, culture, family, ancestry and love. See her books on Amazon.

Agony of the Heart: A Few Comments

Since the beginning of the year, I’ve been making short videos. No, they aren’t professionally produced, and good or bad, they are what they are. I simply wish to say a few words and hopefully, readers will get to know me a little better.

Here is my latest video, where I talk about my book, Agony of the Heart, which covers the issues of interfaith marriage, postpartum depression and more. And of course, at the heart of it all is a love story. 🙂


D.M. Miller is the author of the interfaith “Heart” series as well as the poetry collection, Dandelion Fuzz and memoir, Half-Jew: Searching for Identity. The product of an interfaith marriage herself, Miller’s work explores the difficult themes of religion, politics, ethnicity, culture, family, ancestry and love. See her books on Amazon.