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Scalise Shooting and Echoes of Palestinian Terrorism

Pop, pop! Shots rang out. One witness remembers the gunfire coming out in pairs. Pop, pop! Four people were hit, one a U.S. Congressman. A Republican Congressman.

It was a dirty election season, but the mudslinging was child’s play before the vote. Once reality set in that Trump had won, leftwing devastation turned to rage.

What we’ve been experiencing in this country is a total loss of respect, common sense and civility. Why? We are not barbarians, are we?

In the past, there were people from other countries wanting to emulate the United States, but now we are emulating third world nations where dictators are overthrown in coups d’état and savages parade around with the heads of the deposed. But this is a democracy, and the president was elected fair and square. Any attempts to prove otherwise have failed thus far, and it’s time to come to terms with the fact that the pendulum has shifted to the other side as it always does. After eight years of a president Republicans hated, the country now has a president Democrats hate. You can’t impeach the man simply because you cannot accept your own loss, and inciting hatred and violence is flat-out wrong.

And yet, that is exactly what has been happening. This environment of anger and hatred has been instigated by politicians, the media, celebrities, teachers and professors, and even everyday people on social media. But it’s got to stop. At some point, incitement leads to real violence, and it’s already happened.

Israelis are all too familiar with this scenario. Palestinian leaders on both sides, the PA’s Mahmoud Abbas and Hamas’ Ismail Haniyeh, Khaled Meshal and others, preach hatred and encourage violence, rewarding terrorists and the families of so-called “martyrs” with financial bonuses for killing Jews. They promise the eternal reward of Paradise. One sure way to reach not only Paradise but everlasting fame here on Earth is to kill Jews, they say. As a testament to that, they name schools, streets and plazas after the terrorists, paying their families and paying salaries to those who land in Israeli prisons.

The hatred begins with their mothers’ milk. Cartoons and muppets on television teach children to kill Jews. Proud parents take pictures of their babies dressed in combat clothes with guns and ammo by their sides. Youth camps carry on the idea along with school textbooks, and government and religious teachings.

Without incitement, things would change. But when hatred oozes into every fiber of our being as it’s drilled into us in all aspects of our lives, eventually, someone will act out on the rage.

It happens far too often in Israel. And now, in America, Republicans are the Jews. Called every name in the book from racist to Islamophobic and a whole host of others, the message is clear: hate the Republican. Kill the Republican. Congressman Steve Scalise was shot as a direct result of this violent message.

In the case of this attack, the gunman asked if the people in the ball field were Democrats or Republicans. It was no different from Islamic terror attacks when the assailants ask first if their potential victims are Muslim or not. If they are Muslim, they are spared. If the ball players had been Democrats, they would have been spared.

This message of hate must stop. We must work together and remember we are all a part of this great nation. We are not barbarians. We are Americans. Let’s act like it.


D.M. Miller is the author of the interfaith “Heart” series as well as the poetry collection, Dandelion Fuzz and memoir, Half-Jew: Searching for Identity. The product of an interfaith marriage herself, Miller’s work explores the difficult themes of religion, politics, ethnicity, culture, family, ancestry and love. See her books on Amazon.


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Pulse Nightclub Terror Attack: More Hatred and Violence

The Other Shoes

The Capital of Israel

Geography lesson: What is the capital of Israel? Capital quizzes should be easy, simply a matter of memorization. Write out the flashcards and study until you’ve got it down pat. At least, that’s normally the case.

Unfortunately, when it comes to Israel, politicians have made a mess of things with their typical philandering, playing multiple sides with their hands in too many pots.

Ask any Israeli the capital of the Jewish State, and the answer is clear: Jerusalem. How could it be anywhere else? Jerusalem is the eternal capital of the Jewish people and is Judaism’s holiest city.

Benjamin Netanyahu recently reflected on the Six Day War and the moment when Israeli forces recaptured the Old City, seeing and touching the Kotel for the first time in their lives, and reunifying Jerusalem to allow freedom to all religions there. “It was like a lightning bolt — I can’t describe it any other way,” the Israeli Prime Minister said.

At that time Jews everywhere rejoiced upon hearing Col. Motta Gur’s words: “The Temple Mount is in our hands! I repeat, the Temple Mount is in our hands!”

The troops were under attack, but they were on a mission to regain control of the holy sites. Upon reaching the Kotel, the men were in tears. On a radio broadcast from that day, Yossi Ronen said, “I’m walking right now down the steps towards the Western Wall. I’m not a religious man, I never have been, but this is the Western Wall and I’m touching the stones of the Western Wall.”

Words cannot describe that feeling.

Jerusalem is the capital of Israel.

And yet, the rest of the world has decided that Israel is wrong. The capital is Tel Aviv. In fact, when I was a child growing up in New Jersey, I distinctly remember learning in public school that the capital of Israel was Tel Aviv. The maps even said so!

But who made the maps? The facts are not always what they seem.

The thing is, nations choose their own capitals. Imagine if the Israeli government told the U.S., no, Washington D.C. is not your capital. And imagine if they started printing maps with a star next to New York City. “We want the modern, vibrant city of New York to be your capital and will not accept your choice of Washington.”

Sure, I know I’m simplifying the matter, but think about this: If the United States had lost control of Washington, then got it back in a battle, the masses would cheer, and no one would question the status of the city.

Now here’s what’s really interesting. In a recent survey, 56 percent of Palestinians answered that they didn’t care if the U.S. moved the embassy to Jerusalem. This nonsense of such a move impeding the peace process is only a red tape issue among politicians. Take away the hatred and take away the financial interests of those calling the shots, and it’s a no-brainer. Move the embassy.

The capital of Israel is Jerusalem. Period.


D.M. Miller is the author of the interfaith “Heart” series as well as the poetry collection, Dandelion Fuzz and memoir, Half-Jew: Searching for Identity. The product of an interfaith marriage herself, Miller’s work explores the difficult themes of religion, politics, ethnicity, culture, family, ancestry and love. See her books on Amazon.

Political Correctness in Fiction

Does political correctness belong in fiction? After receiving an unfair review for The Religion of the Heart, accusing the book of political correctness, I have a few words to say about that. And incidentally, I have my suspicions that whoever left the review did not read the book but merely made assumptions, essentially judging the book by its cover.

If that’s the case, maybe the book needs a new cover! Hmm…


D.M. Miller is the author of the interfaith “Heart” series as well as the poetry collection, Dandelion Fuzz and memoir, Half-Jew: Searching for Identity. The product of an interfaith marriage herself, Miller’s work explores the difficult themes of religion, politics, ethnicity, culture, family, ancestry and love. See her books on Amazon.

Ten Questions with… Maria Gibbs

Maria Gibbs is the author of the newly released novel, A Boy from the Streets, about twins living separate lives, one of privilege and the other in poverty. Though this book is her first full-length novel, the British writer has three thought-provoking novelettes, all of which I’ve read and highly recommend: A Lifetime or a Season (A Woman’s Journey to Self-Awareness), As Dreams Are Made on, and The Storm Creature.

Intrigued by her writing, I wanted to find out more about the author and her work.

Hi Maria. Thank you for sitting down to answer a few questions. First off, I’d just like to say that I find your writing so creative and unique, and your descriptive language really pulls me in as a reader. Do you have a background in writing, or how did you get started? Continue reading “Ten Questions with… Maria Gibbs”

National Poetry Month 2017

April is National Poetry Month, which got me thinking about my own work. Like many novelists, my writing began with poetry, something I started at the age of 12 and continued through my mid-20s. Then last year as I whittled down the hundreds of poems I’d written to the best 110 for a book, I was inspired to write some new ones. A few made it into the book, Dandelion Fuzz, while more have been hanging around, waiting for the next collection, which will again be a mixture of some old and some new.

While working on my current work in progress, the next Heart series novel, I’ve been toying around with the idea of going ahead and publishing the new poetry book. Should I, or shouldn’t I? I’m just not sure.

In the meantime, here is a poem from Dandelion Fuzz: Continue reading “National Poetry Month 2017”

Five Lives #BookReview

Five Lives – One Day in Bahrain is a novella I read not long ago. Written by Rohini Sunderam, Five Lives is an enjoyable book with characters from various walks of life all living in Bahrain. The story was put together in a unique way, portraying five lives with events occurring in between the five prayer times. It really gives a sense of what life is like in Bahrain within the context of these characters, along with supporting characters for each. Continue reading “Five Lives #BookReview”

Book Reviews

They say that book reviews are the lifeblood of an author. While that may be overstating it, they are essential yet difficult to come by for independent authors. Famous authors are a different story. Backed by huge publishing companies and a healthy marketing budget, they have plenty of important contacts and resources. As these authors have already hit the big time, readers are ready and willing to leave reviews, and the evidence of this is in the thousands of reviews they have for each book.

On the other hand, independent authors don’t have a big marketing budget, and we survive mainly on word of mouth. Reviews go a long way because they help potential readers to decide whether or not it’s worth it to take a chance on an unknown author. And there are plenty of pretty amazing unknown authors who will never be discovered. Many aren’t looking for riches. We’re simply hoping to get our work out there, and if we can actually pay the bills with our writing, all the better.

Keep in mind, a review doesn’t have to be long. Some readers do write lengthy reviews which is wonderful, but if that’s not you, no problem. Just a one or two sentence review would be great.

Thanks so much for your support, and happy reading!


D.M. Miller is the author of the interfaith “Heart” series as well as the poetry collection, Dandelion Fuzz and memoir, Half-Jew: Searching for Identity. The product of an interfaith marriage herself, Miller’s work explores the difficult themes of religion, politics, ethnicity, culture, family, ancestry and love. See her books on Amazon.