What Makes a Writer?

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Author Glen R. Stansfield asks the question, “What makes a writer?” All you have to do is sit down and write… right?

Maybe not.

The author shares his thoughts:

What makes a writer? Ask that question of a hundred people and you will get as many different answers.

Any author will tell you that in the course of their career they will come across an untold number of people who ‘could have written a book if they wanted to,’ or ‘would write, but just don’t have the time,’ and a multitude of other reasons why they haven’t written the latest best seller.

I have to confess I used to be one of those who thought ‘it can’t be that difficult; lots of people do it.’ Well let me tell you, writing of any sort is darned hard. Hemingway once said ‘There is nothing to writing. All you do is sit down at a typewriter and bleed’, and he wasn’t far wrong. When I finish writing a novel, I am drained, physically and emotionally, but I wouldn’t swap it for anything else.

Like any other craft, skill, whatever you want to call it, it has to be learned, and the learning can sometimes be brutal, especially when you put your ‘baby’ up for critique and it gets torn to shreds. But it’s that kind of harshness that should make us better writers. Don’t get me wrong, I’m not saying…

Click here to continue reading.


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Glen R. Stansfield is the author of Fishing for Stones and the newly released Harry, both available on Amazon. He writes in the crime/mystery/ thriller genre.


 

 

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One thought on “What Makes a Writer?

  1. There is skill in writing, however, with those skills comes the responsibility of accuracy which takes research of the subject along with proper grammar, spelling, punctuation etc, etc, etc. Subjects Subjects that are written about seldom have any scientific meniue which would give it credence or total believability. Writters/ authors tend to use convincing dialogue which makes the subject subjective instead of objective or even historical. Fiction, however, seems to be a trademark of reality from newspaper’s to history and science theory to creation. Reputations concerning where one is educated is more important than truth. There was a man who once asked, “What is truth”?

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